About Me

  • I'm CEO of Newspeg.com, a social news-sharing platform. I've spent 20 years at the intersection of traditional and digital journalism. I've helped to invent ways to read and interact with the news and advertising on computer screens and iPads, and before that, I wrote news stories on typewriters and six-ply paper. I co-founded WashingtonPost.com and hyperlocal pioneers Backfence.com and GrowthSpur; served as editor of Philly.com; taught media entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland; and have done product-development and strategy consulting for all sorts of media and Internet companies. You can read more about me here.

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October 27, 2009

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twitter.com/agbulkeley

Fewer readers. Not less readers.

Account Deleted

And we're not even taking into account population growth here. The percentage of population reached by newspapers is shrinking even faster than the sheer declines in circulation.

Media buying has a significant cost to it, beyond what I actually pay for media. That transaction cost is quickly becoming a "why bother?" when talking about newspapers.

@This is me -- stupid comments like yours are part of the reason for the decline in newspapers. Too many people paying attention to insignificant details that the vast majority of readers don't value. And I say this as a former copy editor.

Bob Griendling

I think there is another reason for the decline in newsprint readers: No longer do mainstream newspapers seek the truth. Instead, they seek "balance" because "he said, she said" journalism requires little research. They are afraid of the right's criticism, so they take the easy road. I've noticed that I get more information, more facts from columnists than from reporters, especially when it comes to political issues.

News Commonsense

Katherine Warman Kern

So what has happened to their online audience? Why look at just print subscription to judge demand for brand?

Here's my take on the decline - "When ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise." http://bit.ly/5hAc3

Katherine Warman Kern
@comradity

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