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« Outdated Magazines | Main | Seven Wonders »

September 17, 2007

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Comments

knackeredhack

I guess people will pay for something that is scarce. I had just started to subscribe from the UK, having ignored or resisted before. I kept getting driven to TimesSelect content by blogs like Cafe Hayek. It seemed to me if you wanted to be part of certain "conversations" there was a price to pay. Like you, I don't believe all journalism can or should be free. From my distant position it seems an admission of a lack of editorial ambition for what large collections of journalists under a single management can provide the public. But then I suspect most major newspapers are no more than the sum of their parts, and these days sometimes much less.

Steve Boriss

"the fact is that TimesSelect was the right idea, badly executed."

This might be said about anything, even such things as Communism under Stalin. The concept that there is some material that is so valuable and unique that web browsers are willing to pay for it is valid, as the WSJ is proving. The reality that the NY Times is actually a producer of such content is not. (Steve Boriss, TheFutureOfNews.com)

Steve Boriss

"the fact is that TimesSelect was the right idea, badly executed."

This might be said about anything, even such things as Communism under Stalin. The concept that there is some material that is so valuable and unique that web browsers are willing to pay for it is valid, as the WSJ is proving. The reality that the NY Times is actually a producer of such content is not. (Steve Boriss, TheFutureOfNews.com)

Rocky

My biggest problem with TimesSelect was that they were taking the content that was most valuable as linkbait and locking it up.

I'm very surprised that they decided to make much of the archives free.

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